Back road in the Hill Country

Texas Hill Country
Map

We’ve divided the Texas Hill Country into nine (9) regions. Each has its own distinctive characteristics, with cities that offer a wealth of attractions and activities. Enjoy your exploration of each Region! Click here to download HCV Map.

/ REGIONAL MAP

Blanco River

Blanco, Texas was settled 1853 by a pioneer stockmen who had to
fortify homes against hostile Indians. It was named Blanco (Spanish
word meaning white) for the Blanco River.

The centerpiece of town square is the Old Blanco County Courthouse, a
fine example of Second Empire style architecture. The town was the
Blanco County seat from 1858 to 1891, when the county seat was
moved to centrally located. Johnson City, Texas.

Blanco, Texas is now a popular tourist and resort area in the Texas Hill
Country . The town square is joined to the state park by a two-block
City Park, with a nature trail featuring a Xeriscape garden

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Fredericksburg

Fredericksburg, Texas was founded in 1846 by German
immigrants. The town boasts a population of 10,530
residents and has spectacular views of Texas Hill Country.
Fredericksburg has retained much of its German history, with
many of the older buildings keeping their original German
styles.

In fact, the town’s original inhabitants refused to speak
English and founded a new dialect called Texas German. The
history of Fredericksburg is rich and the town has many
exciting places to stay and things to do.

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Frio & Sabinal River

The Frio River rises from the juncture of the East, West, and Dry Frio
rivers (at 29°44′ N, 99°45′ W) and flows southeast, across central
Uvalde and Frio counties and northeastern LaSalle, northern McMullen,
and northwestern Live Oak counties, for 200 miles to its mouth on the
Nueces River, a mile south of Three Rivers (at 28°26′ N, 98°11′ W).

The Sabinal River rises in fissure springs that flow from great slabs of
limestone in the Lost Maples State Natural Area, seven miles north of
Vanderpool in northwestern Bandera County. It flows southeast to the
Balcones Escarpment, where its course changes to the east and then to
the west, and thence to its mouth on the Frio River, ten miles south of
Sabinal. The river is sixty miles long. In several places it sinks
underground to rise again downstream.

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Highland Lakes

Before 1860, he had marked boulders on either side of the
river to show where a dam should be built, and in 1887
(after losing his eyesight in the Civil War), he founded a city
by “the great marble falls” a few miles downstream.

Buchanan Dam was completed in 1938 by the newly-created
Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA), about 80 years after
Johnson marked the spot, and a series of dams down the
river created the Highland Lakes chain along the Colorado
River. The wild land has become a tourist and retirement
paradise, and the five “Highland Lakes,” each with its own
unique character, attract thousands of visitors every year.

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Llano & South Llano Rivers

The Llano River is one of the few popular fly fishing destinations in
Texas. It runs through the Hill Country towns of Junction, Masonand
Llano. Northeast of Llano, it turns sharply to the southeast, joining the
Colorado from the northwest as an arm of Lake LBJ.

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Lower Guadalupe River & Canyon Lake

The Guadalupe River is one of the most beautiful and adventure ready
destinations in Texas. The upper river runs fast and is lined up at the
banks with limestone and pecan and bald Cyprus trees. This part of the
river is popular as a tubing destination in the spring and summer. The
perfectly paced water with the shades offered by trees on the banks
gives tourists a spectacular experience, one that can be enjoyed and
shared with friends and family.

Canyon Lake, Texas offers lots of fun and thrills, especially if you love
water activities. Canyon Lake is a small yet beautiful place located
about 25 miles to the west of New Braunfels and San Marcos and
roughly 40 miles to the north of San Antonio.

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Pedernales River

The upper reaches of the Pedernales River are generally too
shallow for recreational use, but the middle and lower
reaches of the river provide good white water, especially
during periods of high runoff. Two parks have been
established along the Pedernales: Pedernales Falls State Park
and Lyndon B. Johnson State Historical Park. The Pedernales
has been dammed near Johnson City to form Johnson City Lake.

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San Marcos River

The San Marcos River is considered to be one of the most
biologically diverse aquatic ecosystems known in the
Southwestern United States.

It rises from the San Marcos Springs, the location of
Aquarena Springs, in San Marcos, Texas. The springs are
home to several threatened or endangered species. The river
is a popular recreational area, and is frequented for tubing,
canoeing, swimming, and fishing.

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Upper Guadalupe & Medina Rivers

The Medina River is one of the calmest rivers in the Texas Hill Country. It’s a perfect scene for a relaxing day out. Lined with beautiful bald cypress trees and clear waters, you and your family can cool down and enjoy tubing or kayaking while enjoying the amazing views of nature.

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